Culture & Art

Jul 1, 2015

Weaves of cotton

Pakistan is today one of the main producers of textiles in the world, accounting for about 9 % of the textile needs, producing several types of textile products: cotton spinning (yarn), cotton weaving (cloth), cotton fabric, home textiles, fabric processing, hosiery, towels and knitwear and apparels.

From as far back as 3000 BCE, there have been discoveries of woven and dyed cottons in Pakistan. There's a very old tradition in cotton, mainly because it is a very common plant in the country.

Today, the textile industry is the major export in Pakistan. With hundreds of factories spread, the main product of the country is exported mostly to United States, United Kingdom, China, Germany and Bangladesh, accounting for almost 60 percent of Pakistan's exports.

Because fabric is this huge part of Pakistan's economy, cotton ends up pairing with it, with over 1 million cotton farmers and around 3 million hectares of cotton farming. Since 194, cotton – bales went from 1.1 million bales to 10 million bales by 2000.

Number of mills increased from 3 to 600 and spindles from about 177,000 to 805 million similarly looms and finishing units increased. The planting season takes place from February to June and the harvest from August to December and the major cotton producing areas are Punjab, accounting for about 80 percent of total production and Sindh, with 20% of production. This cotton goes on to be processed and transformed into cotton yarn, cotton cloth, and made-up textiles and apparel.

The fabric begins to grow

In the 1950's and 60's, after Pakistan became independent in 1947, there was a sudden crescent of looming and spinning factories, rising up to 300 000, creating the necessity of a proportional number of processing units for dyeing, printing, bleaching, finishing, packing and packaging: the unorganized power loom sector was mass-producing raw-fabrics. It was a granted opportunity for entrepreneurs and pioneers of the processing sector, who jumped in and drove the country to be self-sufficient in dress and apparel, while quality fabrics were exported to the international market.

Today, the textile industry comprises nearly half of country's manufacturing and almost 40 percent of the country's labor force. And it is still growing. Recently, the government implemented the Textiles Policy 2014-19, which aims to not only set out a development road map but to provide necessary support without which accelerated progress of textiles in Pakistan is not possible. 

NTU

Al of this history of textiles, gave the country the opportunity to create the National Textile University. 

In 1954, a group of visionaries imagined a Textile Institute that could be world famous. The government of Punjab and the leading textile industrialists united to form the Institute of Textile Technology in Faisalabad (then Lyallpur). Kohinoor Industries, Colony Textile Mills, Dawood Foundation and Lyallpur Cotton Mills provided funds for the construction of building and provision of other infrastructures. The Government of U.K. provided equipment and machinery, as well as experts in the field, and on the 12th of October 1959, the foundation stone of the Institute was set. In 1965, the Institute was granted affiliation by the University Of Engineering & Technology, Lahore, and it was renamed as "National College of Textile Engineering". In 1966, the first graduate engineers of the school finished their courses.

The President of Pakistan is the Chancellor of the University. Ever since its inception, National Textile University has been the premier Institute of textile education in the country, meeting the technical and managerial human resource needs of almost entire textile industry of Pakistan. It always retained a close relationship with the industry and industrialists.

The aim is to develop the Textile Industry and Human Resources of Pakistan and make Pakistan an active player in the world economy. The University also aims to collaborate with industry, produce high quality research and provide excellent educational services, as well as launching and establishing facilities for postgraduate studies in textile and allied fields.

NTU programs are designed so that every activity enhances student learning, individual development, ability to think analytically and problem solving approach, with several faculties divided into departments offer courses in miscellaneous areas, all textile related: 

The Faculty of engineering and technology - Department of Yarn manufacturing; Department of weaving; Department of knitting; Department of textile processing; Department of garment manufacturing; Department of polymer engineering;
Department of materials and testing. 

The Faculty of Science: Department of applied sciences; Department of computer science.

The Faculty of Management Sciences: Department of business administration; Department of textile management. 

Finally, the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences comprises the Department of humanities & social sciences, Department of textile design and Department of fashion design.

The goal of the University is to contribute to country's already enormous textile industry with specialized workers in various areas, helping the business thrive with formed and experienced professionals that can actually make it work in the different areas.


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